Coronavirus: the common enemy

The Coronavirus outbreak was first detected in December and emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan. Since then, the number of people infected has exceeded 250,000 and the number of deaths has risen to over 10,000.

Coronavirus: the common enemy

The Coronavirus outbreak was first detected in December and emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan. Since then, the number of people infected has exceeded 250,000 and the number of deaths has risen to over 10,000. The data are undoubtedly frightening, while in many countries of the world the population is confined to their homes in order to minimize contagion and give scientists time to find a vaccine.The seriousness of the matter is not a trivial issue and, for this reason, the whole world is paralyzing its activity leaving the influx on the streets and the work of citizens in favor of health and survival at a minimum.

The scientific advances in the various studies being carried out throughout the world give hope and affirm that the outbreak will be controlled and we will emerge successfully from this great health crisis.what comes nextBefore we hope to find a light in this tunnel of illness, we cannot forget to also keep to the reality of an interconnected world marked by globalisation and the triumph of capitalism. This is also fundamental because it will be a key element in understanding what trail the virus will leave when it is under control.This virus is causing us to lose months of production, it is destroying the work of many people, industries are being transformed to meet health needs and countries are launching the war economy to survive this unprecedented situation. They are seeing their contracts and wages suspended for the duration of their imprisonment.

Many others are being laid off, some fortunate enough to do the work from home while others are forced to attend to their jobs at risk of infection. The vast majority who are seeing their cash flow slowing down will be the ones to drastically reduce consumption when everything can be put back on track.companies and self-employed people have no less problems as they are forced to close their doors or, if the new rules allow them to open, find no demand for their products and services. Despite the measures taken by the authorities to suspend payments to those who have to pay for their activity, expenses always follow one another and income does not arrive, and those companies that survive the confinement will have the challenge of overcoming a long period of absence of clients.