Cultural peculiarities in Spain - what every traveler should know

Despite the current circumstances, there are still many Germans who are toying with the idea of spending their upcoming vacation in Spain. Given all that Spain has to offer travelers, this is not surprising.

Cultural peculiarities in Spain - what every traveler should know

Despite the current circumstances, there are still many Germans who are toying with the idea of spending their upcoming vacation in Spain. Given all that Spain has to offer travelers, this is not surprising. However, especially in such turbulent times as these, it is advisable to familiarize yourself with the cultural characteristics of Spain. This can go a long way in making your holiday a very special experience. So let's take a closer look at some important aspects of Spanish culture.

Our Christmas has a lower significance in SpainIt

is not directly that the Spaniards do not celebrate Christmas or that the celebration has a low significance. However, when talking about Christmas Eve and Christmas Day and Boxing Day, this is true to at least some degree.

There are no presents on any of the three days and Spaniards look forward more to the drawing of the Christmas lottery (El Gordo) on December 22 than to Christmas. Some just sit around at Christmas and play on Nominix, for example, to get in the mood for the year ahead. Epiphany, on the other hand, is a completely different story. While this day tends to have less significance in our country, things are quite different in Spain. In fact, Epiphany is the real Christmas of the Spaniards. On the one hand, there are lively events all over the country.

On the other hand, it is the day on which people give presents to their loved ones.

Polychronic culture and more flexible use of timeUnlike

Germany, Spain is not a monochronic culture, but a polychronic one. This means that in Spain it is common to do several things at the same time. In Germany, on the other hand, it tends to be the case that one thing is done after another. In the end, this leads to a completely different way of dealing with time. While punctuality is very important in Germany, it is a little different in Spain. Spaniards do not see appointments quite so closely and if you are on holiday in the country, you should be prepared for this.

It is best not to take time agreements too seriously and be prepared for delays.

Directness is not always well receivedCriticism

is possible in itself, but should always be formulated carefully. In the worst case, German directness can lead to your conversation partner taking what you say personally and the situation degenerating into an argument. Spaniards are very proud, which is why you should strike the right tone if you have a complaint. Otherwise, an initially pleasant situation can quickly turn into a problem.

Spain is a multilingual countryAlthough

not everyone knows it, Spain is a multilingual country and you should always keep this cultural feature in mind. While you will be able to communicate everywhere with the official language, many Spaniards are proud of their regional language, as it is part of their regional identity. So don't label these languages as Spanish, as this may not go down well.

Basque is actually the oldest language still used in everyday life.