Professional and commercial - what has become of our football?

As professionalism increased, so did the commercialisation of football. This has now reached such proportions that clubs and fans are becoming estranged.

Professional and commercial - what has become of our football?

As professionalism increased, so did the commercialisation of football. This has now reached such proportions that clubs and fans are becoming estranged. However, this is only the tip of the iceberg. Modern football is not well received everywhere. It is not without reason that more and more fans are drawn to the streets. While football remains the most popular sport in the world, its future is uncertain. So let's look together at the consequences of increasing commercialisation.

The gap between leaguesThe

gap between the lower divisions and professional football is widening. A good example of this is the situation in the Regionalliga. The 3rd league was introduced for the 2008/2009 season.

Its purpose is to act as a link between the second Bundesliga and the regional leagues. Due to the 3rd league, the (already low) importance of the regional league decreased massively. While the revenues of the Bundesliga are booming, the lower leagues simply lack money. Many clubs have to disband or merge. Kick-off times also show that there is no solidarity between amateur and professional football.

The gap between individual clubsMany

leagues around the world have the problem that the gap between individual clubs is too large. This gap is mainly related to the unequal distribution of funds. For German clubs, television money is one of the most important sources of income. However, the distribution of this money is based on the clubs' sporting performance.

This leads to a cementing of revenues. Unfortunately, there can hardly be any talk of competition any more. Not to mention that some clubs have well-heeled investors. Other clubs are either unable to land such or simply don't want to.

Astronomical player salariesThere

was a time when football was primarily about having fun. Only very few players really earned much. Nowadays, however, player salaries in the professional leagues amount to astronomical sums. That may all fit. At least as long as the player is playing at a high level. However, should the level drop, it can quickly happen that the own fans are angry about the high salary.

They feel betrayed because the players do not perform as they expect them to.

No attachment to the clubAs

money plays an increasingly important role in football, it has also changed the nature of the players. Many see themselves as sole traders and try to make as much money as possible during their career. This also leads to an increased greed for more lucrative contracts. The attachment to the club practically no longer plays a role. Dembélé and Götze are the best examples of this.

The dilemma with clubs and their fansMany

fans are unhappy with their clubs. This is mainly because everything is becoming increasingly expensive. Some fans can no longer afford the expensive tickets to the stadium. Not to mention that the prices for drinks, snacks and jerseys are also increasing.

Unfortunately, even traditional clubs like Liverpool are not exempt.